Browsing the "vegetables" Tag

10 Tips for a Healthier Diet: Could Eating Unprocessed Foods Improve Your Health?

February 23rd, 2013 | by Brett Gustafson

Eating a balanced diet that largely consists of plants and fresh whole foods is one of the most powerful things you can do to improve your health. Consuming large amounts of processed foods is risky behavior. Eating processed foods have been linked to an increased risk for heart disease, cancer, diabetes, auto-immune illnesses, atherosclerosis, and many more common sicknesses. If you would like to start feeling better, consider these 10 simple suggestions to help you begin your unprocessed diet


Single Moms Take On Local Food Deserts in Asheville North Carolina

January 31st, 2013 | by Brett Gustafson

Asheville has recently been in the news for the adoption of its progressive regional Food Action Plan, which addresses food insecurity/security and access issues. It is no surprise that our town is making food security headlines again, this time with the story of two of Asheville's local residents and inspiring sustainable food leaders, Tema Ayanfe Jamison and Olufemi Lewis


Mexico City’s Green Revolution

November 30th, 2012 | by Brett Gustafson

At Ecolocalizer we are always looking for the ways that the spirit of humanity is continually find its way back to nature. I ran across this article today, and was very inspired to read about how the people in Mexico City are bringing green back to a city that has been notoriously dangerous and polluted for decades.


Ten Tasty & Easy to Grow Perennial Vegetables

March 26th, 2012 | by Dylan Linet

My favorite vegetables in the garden are the ones that require very little work. This handpicked selection of tasty perennial vegetables showcases plants that will consistently come back year after year, whether you give them much care and attention or not


Greening the Food Deserts of East Los Angeles

March 18th, 2012 | by Rhonda Winter

Food insecurity is huge problem in our nation. More families are now in need of food stamps than ever before in the history of our country, and in many neighborhoods liquor stores far outnumber produce markets. However, in the barren food deserts of East Los Angeles, a few small oases of healthy food options are beginning to sprout


Useful Tips for Avoiding Jail Time while Vegetable Gardening in Your Front Yard

July 12th, 2011 | by Patricia Larenas

Before you get caught picking cucumbers in your front yard, are slapped with a fine, and charged with a misdemeanor, here are some sneaky strategies you can try to disguise your subversive gardening acts. You can always resort to planting edible flowers and herbs among the veggies in your front yard, and Big Brother will be none the wiser. It is both disturbing and extremely sad that growing food plants in your front yard garden may get you a misdemeanor in some cities, as happened to Julie Bass in Oak Park, Michigan. But I believe that it is worth leading by example (if you can avoid criminal charges), and working towards changing the aesthetic and attitudes in your own neighborhood. You may even end up helping to restore a more sane understanding of our food and where it comes from


Gardeners Help End Hunger in Their Communities

May 16th, 2011 | by Patricia Larenas

Growing food is a fundamental human activity and part of our social legacy that leads naturally to sharing the abundance with our neighbors. Planting extra edibles and donating the surplus for those in need is not only a simple way for gardeners to contribute to alleviating hunger, but it's also a way to feel a real connection to your community. If you have any space at all to grow vegetables or fruit, you can have a significant impact on not only reducing hunger, but also on promoting better nutrition. Fresh fruits and vegetables are expensive when you are struggling to make ends meet and feed your family, but they are essential for better health and proper nutrition. All that is required is that you grow a little extra and donate what you don't need to your local food bank



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