Economy hard work

Published on January 13th, 2014 | by Rhonda Winter

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Why are Millionaires Attacking Unemployed Poor People?

Senator Bernie Sanders just released a disturbing statistic citing that 95% of all new income generated in the United States in the last few years has gone directly to the most affluent top 1% of our populace. Millions of families have lost their homes, and are in need of food stamps to avoid starving, while the very wealthy just keep getting richer. Our nation’s income inequality gap is more extreme and economically destructive to our society than ever before.

Income Inequality Prevails

Raising our federal minimum wage could help lessen this massive economic chasm, as would instituting a guaranteed basic income. In our nation the myth continues to be perpetuated that if you work hard, anyone can get rich; which inherently implies that if you are not rich, clearly you just have not worked hard enough. In addition to demonizing the poor, this severely flawed ethos also does not account for the multitude of inherited advantages that the wealthy are afforded, as well as the many tax and financial benefits for which they aggressively lobby.

hard work

Slumdogs vs Millionaires

 

The Daily Show’s Jon Stewart recently did an excellent job analyzing these flawed beliefs, while illustrating the ludicrous manner in which our country’s unemployed and financially struggling are consistently ridiculed and unfairly maligned by many politicians and right-wing media outlets.

graphic via Senator Bernie Sanders
image via LA Progressive





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About the Author

was raised by wolves, and subsequently has difficulty interacting with other humans; she can also be found on and Twitter.



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